Leor Zmigrod

ABOUT

Dr Leor Zmigrod is an Early-Career Research Fellow at the University of Cambridge. Her research combines methods from experimental psychology, cognitive science, and neuroscience to investigate the psychology of ideological adherence and group identity formation. In particular, she is interested in investigating cognitive characteristics that might act as vulnerability factors for radicalization and ideologically-motivated behaviour.

 

She completed her PhD at the Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge. Leor’s doctoral research, funded by a Gates Cambridge Scholarship, explored the psychological processes underpinning political, religious, and nationalistic beliefs.

Leor was recently awarded a 3-year Junior Research Fellowship at Churchill College, University of Cambridge. Her research will continue to explore the cognitive and neurobiological roots of participation in collective ideologies and susceptibility to misinformation.

Leor holds a B.A. in Psychological and Behavioural Sciences from the University of Cambridge, and has published work on the neuroscience of agency, creativity, and hallucinations. Her current research interests include political neuroscience, the cognitive science of religion, and the socio-political and psychological roots of nationalism, as well as existentialist philosophy.

Leor is affiliated with the Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute, Department of Psychology, Downing College (B.A. and PhD alumnus), and Churchill College (Junior Research Fellowship) at the University of Cambridge. She has also conducted research at Stanford University, Harvard University, and University College London.

 

Leor is passionate about public engagement and has presented at TEDx and BBC Radio. You can contact Leor about consulting work and public engagement via email (lz343 at cam dot ac dot uk). Please find her CV here.

PUBLICATIONS

1. Zmigrod, L. (in press). The Role of Cognitive Rigidity in Political Ideologies: Theory, Evidence, and Future Directions. Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences.

2. Zmigrod, L., Rentfrow, P.J., & Robbins, T.W. (2019). The Partisan Mind: Is Extreme Political Partisanship Related to Cognitive Inflexibility? Journal of Experimental Psychology: General. See paper here and preprint here.

3. Rollwage, M., Zmigrod, L., De-Wit, L., Dolan, R.J., & Fleming, S.M. (2019). What Underlies Political Polarization? A Manifesto for Computational Political Psychology. Trends in Cognitive Sciences. See paper here.

 

4. Zmigrod, L. (2019). Cognition and religiosity: Who is most likely to believe? Quarterly Journal of the Psychology Postgraduate Affairs Group (British Psychological Society), 111, 22-24. See paper here.

5. Zmigrod, L., Rentfrow, P.J., & Robbins, T.W. (2019). Cognitive Inflexibility Predicts Extremist Attitudes. Frontiers in Psychology (Special Issue: Neural Perspectives on the Moral Psychology of Violent Conflict). 10, 989. See paper here. 

6. Zmigrod, L., Zmigrod, S., Rentfrow, P. J., & Robbins, T. W. (2019). The Psychological Roots of Intellectual Humility: The Role of Intelligence and Cognitive Flexibility. Personality and Individual Differences, 141, 200-208See paper here.

7. Ebert, T., Gotz, F. M., Obschonka, M., Zmigrod, L., & Rentfrow, P. J. (2019). Regional Variation in Courage and Entrepreneurship: The Contrasting Role of Courage for the Emergence and Survival of Start‐Ups in the US. Journal of Personality. See paper here.

8. Zmigrod, L., Rentfrow, P.J., & Robbins, T.W. (2018). Cognitive underpinnings of nationalistic ideology in the context of Brexit. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201708960. See paper here.

9. Zmigrod, L., Rentfrow, P. J., Zmigrod, S., & Robbins, T. W. (2018). Cognitive flexibility and religious disbelief. Psychological Research, 1-11. See paper here.

10. Zmigrod, S., Zmigrod, L., & Hommel, B. (2018). The relevance of the irrelevant: Attentional distractor-response binding predicts performance in the Remote Associates Task. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts. See paper here.

11. Khalighinejad, N., Schurger, A., Desantis, A., Zmigrod, L., & Haggard, P. (2018). Precursor processes of human self-initiated action. NeuroImage, 165, 35-47. See paper here.

12. Zmigrod, L., Garrison, J. R., Carr, J., & Simons, J. S. (2016). The neural mechanisms of hallucinations: A quantitative meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 69, 113-123. See paper here.

13. Zmigrod, L., & Zmigrod, S. (2016). On the Temporal Precision of Thought: Individual Differences in the Multisensory Temporal Binding Window Predict Performance on Verbal and Nonverbal Problem Solving Tasks. Multisensory Research, 29(8), 679-701. See paper here.

14. Zmigrod, S., Zmigrod, L., & Hommel, B. (2016). Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex affects stimulus conflict but not response conflict. Neuroscience, 322, 320-325. See paper here.

15. Zmigrod, S., & Zmigrod, L. (2015). Zapping the gap: Reducing the multisensory temporal binding window by means of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Consciousness and Cognition, 35, 143-149. See paper here.

16. Zmigrod, S., Zmigrod, L., & Hommel, B. (2015). Zooming into creativity: Individual differences in attentional global-local biases are linked to creative thinking. Frontiers in Psychology, 6:1647. See paper here.

ESSAYS 

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